photography, rhea gupte, jewellery, campaign, eina ahluwalia, fashion
photography, rhea gupte, jewellery, campaign, eina ahluwalia, fashion
photography, rhea gupte, jewellery, campaign, eina ahluwalia, fashion
photography, rhea gupte, jewellery, campaign, eina ahluwalia, fashion
photography, rhea gupte, jewellery, campaign, eina ahluwalia, fashion
photography, rhea gupte, jewellery, campaign, eina ahluwalia, fashion
photography, rhea gupte, jewellery, campaign, eina ahluwalia, fashion
photography, rhea gupte, jewellery, campaign, eina ahluwalia, fashion
photography, rhea gupte, jewellery, campaign, eina ahluwalia, fashion

Project Brief

To create a campaign shoot for the client’s new collection Awake, primarily sold on their e-shop; conceptualised around the collection note, ‘Own yourself, your power and your magic.’

Client

Eina Ahluwalia

Credits

Photography, Creative Conceptualisation, Styling, Modelling by Rhea Gupte
Hair and Makeup by Danica Drego
Special thanks to Atikaa Ahluwalia

Styling Credits

All jewellery by Eina Ahluwalia
All garments by Studio Tia

In my ten plus years working in fashion, I have come across several conversations about the mental divide photographers, and creatives in general, seem to have between commercial/client work and personal projects. There is an almost set pattern of thinking; of the former being something one needs to do to earn a living no matter the end result, while the latter is what makes them feel alive as artists and what they usually get very little time to execute.

I was aware of this discrepancy in my former days as a model, on location, surrounded by makeup artists who booked umpteen commercial jobs but would kill if asked to do another nude lip and as a stylist working with other photographers who simply couldn’t care less about the vision they started out with, which was being significantly butchered by an inexperienced art director. There was very little effective communication, no scope for creative exploration and an almost non-existent spirit of collaboration.

Not always, but on most sets.

When I took up photography, I vowed to never create anything I wasn’t proud of and to treat commercial projects with the same love and care that I would for any of my personal shoots. This decision paved the way to take up very selective work with clients who truly understood me and whom I could understand in turn. It made me create rules like, not having the client on set while I am shooting, as much as possible; and not having any person present on set who doesn’t have a specific role in the process. Bearing these in mind, I have given up on work which did not align with these rules and have also seized to pursue certain kinds of work which photographers at large yearn for on their resume. In the bargain, I have been able to keep my happiness and my creativity, along with the certainty that I have never been part of a project I wasn’t absolutely in love with.

When I picked up the camera, a little less than two years back, I decided I wanted to be loved and wanted to treat my clients with love too. I wanted shoots to be an exhilarating creative process instead of the tension-filled sets with forty people storming in and out that I had witnessed as a young model. I wanted to build relationships with my clients, support their vision and create something truly memorable and unique for them.

Every project I have worked on is a testament to this set of rules which make me realise how wonderful it feels to create for like-minded individuals, who want themselves and everyone around them to soar; who push people to be the best versions of themselves and to create the best version through their craft. How wonderful it feels to create for your own tribe!





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