beauty, black and white, towel series, rhea gupte, the girl from FUSS, editorial, natural, no retouching, film, fashion
beauty, black and white, towel series, rhea gupte, the girl from FUSS, editorial, natural, no retouching, film, fashion
beauty, black and white, towel series, rhea gupte, the girl from FUSS, editorial, natural, no retouching, film, fashion
beauty, black and white, towel series, rhea gupte, the girl from FUSS, editorial, natural, no retouching, film, fashion
beauty, black and white, towel series, rhea gupte, the girl from FUSS, editorial, natural, no retouching, film, fashion
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beauty, black and white, towel series, rhea gupte, the girl from FUSS, editorial, natural, no retouching, film, fashion

Client

Personal Project

Concept

Shooting on film in our hotel room just before the flight out

Credits

Photography by Anai Bharucha | Modelling by Rhea Gupte

Being in the the ‘instant’, fast-paced phenomenon, that is the world today, there is a special beauty in shooting on film. The mystery of not knowing how the labor of love is bound to turn out and the wait as the film goes through development and leaves one inching to see the end result, have a unique significance. Perhaps only comparable to the feat of climbing atop a mountain with bare, scathed hands or kneading bread from scratch to finally indulge in the whiff of some oven-baked goodness. The idea of dying art, extinct practices make me mournful of the fact that we let something slip. Or that we let something replace what was. Harsh word, that, ‘Replacement’.

Lucky for me, on one 6:00 am morning, I got the chance to sneak in an impromptu shoot in our twin-shared hotel room with Anai in Hyderabad. We had been shooting for fourteen hours straight on a commercial project the previous day, but being the way we are, it barely deterred our spirit to wake up extra early for a quick story before we dashed out to the airport.

It was my first time posing in front of a film camera. Something I had always wanted to do, but never got the opportunity to try. I guess nine years of being in front of digital cameras came down to this one moment of truth. To be able to achieve the perfect images in limited frames. We had, precisely, fifteen.

I think instances like this make one realise the value of time and resources. Limited frames versus endless clicks, expensive procedures versus sticking a memory card into your laptop. Makes we wonder, are we better off, or are we losing the essence of what a discipline is about? Without the privilege of editing, or correcting a pose or expression, or cropping a frame, I thought of everything differently. I would never slack off in front of the camera during any shoot, but this process which lasted only a few minutes, seemed more intimate, connected and memorable than an endless burst of the trigger.





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    1. Thank you Faiyaz! The texture is a result of a defective film. However both the photographer and I thought that effect was really special even though unintentional.