pop art, inspiration, bright colors, fashion editorial, photography, rhea gupte, l'officiel india, fashion editorial, blue sky, cloudy, wigs, colorful makeup
pop art, inspiration, bright colors, fashion editorial, photography, rhea gupte, l'officiel india, fashion editorial, blue sky, cloudy, wigs, colorful makeup
pop art, inspiration, bright colors, fashion editorial, photography, rhea gupte, l'officiel india, fashion editorial, blue sky, cloudy, wigs, colorful makeup
pop art, inspiration, bright colors, fashion editorial, photography, rhea gupte, l'officiel india, fashion editorial, blue sky, cloudy, wigs, colorful makeup
pop art, inspiration, bright colors, fashion editorial, photography, rhea gupte, l'officiel india, fashion editorial, blue sky, cloudy, wigs, colorful makeup
pop art, inspiration, bright colors, fashion editorial, photography, rhea gupte, l'officiel india, fashion editorial, blue sky, cloudy, wigs, colorful makeup

Project Brief

Print editorial taking inspiration from Pop Art

Client

L’Officiel India

Concept

A narrative on how the art movement could translate into the present

Credits

Photography, Styling, Art Direction by Rhea Gupte
Hair and Makeup by Namah Shah
Modelling by Samantha Nastaite at TFM
Eye props Designed by Another Day Another Colour

Styling Credits

Look 1Payal Khandwala skirt draped as scarf | Kristy de Cunha dress
Look 2 Hemant and Nandita Dress
Look 3 Hemant and Nandita Coat | Payal Khandwala Dress
Look 4 Miuniku Dress
Look 5 Nida Mahmood Body suit | Nikasha Skirt

Creative freedom is under-rated. You know, when a clients starts off with an applause, a seemingly honest appreciation for your existing work and a promise to provide a free reign to create as you wish? Those golden words. Suddenly it has already been two weeks and slowly the conversation digresses into reference images; how I despise those, a sudden brief which appears out of thin air, a shocking self-realisation of the fact that the afore mentioned reigns are far from free. A valid brief is understandable and respected but the spawning of one under the guise of ‘creative freedom,’ not so much. I have heard ballads from peers of how expectations were crushed with a swift email or worse a misleading phone call, asking for something that looks ‘a bit like this.’ Insert attachment. My problem with creating something that looks a little bit like this, is, that why would I want to create something that looks anything like something which already exists? Let’s leave that for another discussion.

Somehow, —read through taking an interest and trying to understand my client/s beforehand— I have managed to steer clear of any of these seemingly obnoxious people from hiring me. But the horror stories continue, one more tragic than the other, ultimately reducing a creative to a mere puppet than an artist. There are several sensible ways to go about this if I was a client. Step one, know what you want. Essential. Step two, hire somebody whose work aligns with what you want; instead of forcing your aesthetic onto an unsuspecting soul. Step 3, state your brief in the beginning of the project, this has a lot to do with knowing what you want, in order to be able to create an effective brief.

All said and done, nothing beats the freedom to create with likeminded people for likeminded people. This shoot was exactly that. An unparalleled joy to see a makeup artist use a face as a canvas and to see an artist create multiple versions and designs of prop ideas to choose from. Neither were there reference images, nor specific expectations. The brief sent by me being a colour palette, words, production details and a very strong message which encouraged to explore. Resultant of which, here is my take on what 50’s Pop Art could visually and aesthetically translate into today. Carried out with the help of very able shoulders.





Join the conversation

  1. As I was reading this, I thought to myself, there is no way she wasn’t given creative freedom here! I’m so glad you were because the pops of colour, the eccentric nature of it all and the super cool high fashion aesthetic just screams your name all over it! Its so amazing to see all the work that you come up with and the way you’ve styled Indian designers and made them your own!

    x
    Shloka
    thesilksneaker.com

  2. Being from the creative industry myself, I completely agree with you Rhea. Nothing ruins the joy out of a job, when you are left in the complete control of someone else’s hands and worse, when you have completely opposing ideas.
    The 50’s and 60’s Pop Art was an era to live in, don’t you think? Personally, I loved the Twiggy phase.
    This shoot easily translates into that and so much more.